Energy prices in Europe today

See electricity spot prices across Europe today, country by country.

Electricity spot price on February 9, 2023

๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Centre-North) most expensive today

The most expensive electricity spot price in Europe today is in Italy (Centre-North), with an average price of โ‚ฌ0.180 per kWh.

๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (North) is the cheapest, with an average electricity spot price of โ‚ฌ0.019 per kWh.

Price area

Avg. โ‚ฌ/kWh High โ‚ฌ/kWh Low โ‚ฌ/kWh
#1 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Centre-North) +5,9% 0.180 0.257 0.147
#2 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Centre-South) +5,9% 0.180 0.257 0.147
#3 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (North) +5,9% 0.180 0.257 0.147
#4 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Sardinia) +5,9% 0.180 0.257 0.147
#5 ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท France +9,1% 0.180 0.257 0.147
#6 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (South) +4,5% 0.178 0.257 0.147
#7 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช Ireland +8,7% 0.173 0.218 0.149
#8 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Calabria) -0,1% 0.170 0.238 0.147
#9 ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น Italy (Sicily) -0,1% 0.170 0.238 0.147
#10 ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ญ Switzerland -5,5% 0.163 0.192 0.142
#11 ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ท Greece +0,8% 0.159 0.238 0.121
#12 ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ด Romania -0,4% 0.157 0.238 0.121
#13 ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฌ Bulgaria -0,5% 0.157 0.238 0.121
#14 ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡บ Hungary -3,7% 0.157 0.235 0.120
#15 ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ท Croatia -3,8% 0.155 0.207 0.123
#16 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฎ Slovenia -4,1% 0.155 0.197 0.124
#17 ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡น Austria -4,9% 0.154 0.185 0.124
#18 ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ช Belgium -5,6% 0.153 0.211 0.119
#19 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฐ Slovakia -6,8% 0.151 0.195 0.119
#20 ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ธ Serbia -9,6% 0.150 0.201 0.116
#21 ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡น Portugal +5,1% 0.145 0.165 0.137
#22 ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ธ Spain +5,1% 0.145 0.165 0.137
#23 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฑ Netherlands -7,5% 0.143 0.198 0.112
#24 ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฑ Poland -14,7% 0.141 0.169 0.112
#25 ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฟ Czech Republic -12,6% 0.138 0.184 0.110
#26 ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ช Germany -12,9% 0.133 0.175 0.110
#27 ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡บ Luxembourg -12,9% 0.133 0.175 0.110
#28 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (East) -17,4% 0.089 0.105 0.080
#29 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (South) -17,4% 0.089 0.105 0.080
#30 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (West) -17,4% 0.089 0.105 0.080
#31 ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฐ Denmark (West) -34,2% 0.088 0.108 0.078
#32 ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ช Estonia -31,6% 0.079 0.128 0.020
#33 ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ป Latvia -32,4% 0.079 0.128 0.020
#34 ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡น Lithuania -32,4% 0.079 0.128 0.020
#35 ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฐ Denmark (East) -82,1% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#36 ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฎ Finland -62,9% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#37 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (Mid) -23,1% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#38 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช Sweden (North) -23,1% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#39 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช Sweden (Mid-North) -23,1% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#40 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช Sweden (Mid-South) -62,1% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#41 ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช Sweden (South) -78,6% 0.022 0.030 0.007
#42 ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด Norway (North) -10,2% 0.019 0.023 0.007


All prices are current open market spot prices without local vat, tax or other additions.
Data source is entsoe.eu

Frequently asked questions about energy and electricity

What is a kWh?

kWh stands for kilowatt-hour, and is a unit that tells how much energy is used in one hour. Kilo means a thousand. So for example, if you have a 1000 watt oven on for one hour, you have used 1 kilowatt-hour. For a light bulb, which may only consume 10 watt, it will take 100 hours (just over 4 days) before you have used 1 kWh.

What is spot price?

Most electricity companies in Europe buy electricity on a common market place, such as Nord Pool. All power plants that produce electricity and electricity companies that supply electricity to homes and businesses meet there. Based on supply and demand, prices are set for each hour and each area, one day in advance. Some countries, such as Norway, are divided into several different price areas, each of which has its own spot price.

What determines the electricity spot price?

Supply and demand determine the price of electricity in Europe. If there is a high production of electricity from power plants and demand is low, the price will fall. If, on the other hand, the production of electricity is small and demand is high, prices will increase. Therefore, the price of electricity is often highest in winter, as the need for electricity for heating is highest.

What uses the most electricity at home?

Heating certainly uses the most electricity, closely followed by hot water and charging electric cars. Electrical appliances such as TVs, mobile phones and computers use very little electricity in relation to heating.